Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Study Guide

One of the main learning objectives in this overall study is to show the connectionsof a leader’s emotional intelligence (skill base) and the impact on their ability tocreate transformation.  The ability to create, inspire, and share vision is probably themost fundamental requirement of transformational leadership.  The complex set ofbehaviors and relationship dynamics that enable this are fueled by emotionalintelligence.

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Posted on:2016-02-18

Enhancing Coaching Skills and Emotional Intelligence Through Training

Even though many organizations invest in attempting to enhance the emotional intelligence of employees (Goleman et al., 2002), there is surprisingly little published research showing whether or not emotional intelligence can in fact be enhanced. In one study Chapman (2005) found that emotional intelligence as measured by the Boston Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (BEIQ (Weisinger, 1988)) increased, following a leadership coaching programme specifically designed to enhance leaders’ emotional intelligence. Similarly, Kampa-Kokesch (2002) found that executive coaching could improve managers’ levels of transformational leadership, which are in turn related to emotional intelligence competencies(Srivastava and Bharamanaikar, 2004).Similarly, although there is past research examining the impact of coaching on factors such as wellbeing (Greenet  al., 2006), goal attainment (Grant, 2003) and leadership style(Smither et al., 2003; Wasylyshyn, 2003), there are few published papers on the impact of coaching skills training on managers’ coaching skills. Using an interview-based methodology Graham et al.(1994) surveyed 87 account representatives who worked for13 sales managers involved in a coaching skills programme, and found significant increases in follow-up ratings on five behaviours, including clarity in performance expectations, providing feedback, and rewarding performance. To date there has been no research that looks at the impact of coaching-skill training on both emotional intelligence and individuals’ coaching skills levels. The aim of the present research was to extend previous research and compare the effect of two coaching skills training programmes, of the type often used in workplace settings, on participants’ coaching skills and levels of emotional intelligence. One programme was a13-week programme, the other was a short intensive two-day training course.

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Posted on:2016-02-15

Emotional Intelligence - Issues and Common Misunderstandings

In this article we seek to raise issues and air questions that have arisen along with the growing interest in emotional intelligence. We hope to catalyze a dialogue among all those with serious interests in the area, to surface hidden assumptions, correct mistaken impressions, and survey a range of opinions. Such open dialogue, we believe, can pay off to the degree it strengthens the research and thinking that are the foundations of the field—both in theory and in applications.

 

The influence of emotional intelligence on popular culture and the academic community has been rapid and widespread. While this has stimulated a surprising number or research initiatives across a wide range of domains within psychology, the swiftness with which the concept of emotional intelligence has caught on perhaps inevitably created a gap between what we know and what we need to know. Understandably, this has led to a great deal of controversy and debate among researchers and practitioners eager to understand and apply the principles associated with emotional intelligence. Such debate, of course, is not confined to emotional intelligence, but is an inherent part of the process of theory development and scientific discovery in any field. 

 

Research and theory on emotions has waxed and waned over the history of psychology. The behavior revolution inspired by B. F. Skinner and the subsequent  cognitive revolution saw interest in emotion seriously undermined. However, beginning in the 1980s and accelerating into the present, interest in emotions has enjoyed a robust resurgence across a wide range of subdisciplines within psychology, neuroscience, and the health sciences—especially the renewed focus on positive psychology, well-being, and mind/body medicine. While such research continues to expand our knowledge of emotions, fundamental questions remain regarding emotional intelligence.

 

 

We seek to raise important questions and issues for the field. The questions we address include: What is emotional intelligence (EI)? How is it different from other established constructs within psychology? Is it possible to develop EI? Is EI a better predictor of work performance than traditional measures of intelligence—or, more precisely, which kinds of work performance does EI predict most strongly? Should EI be measured at all? Finally, what is the relationship between ethics and EI?

 

 

All of these are legitimate questions, and each has been raised by many voices in the field. In this article we seek to add to the ongoing dialogue by clarifying our own position, and helping to differentiate and sharpen the issues. We also seek to address some common claims about emotional intelligence that may foster consequential, even unfortunate misunderstandings.

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Posted on:2011-06-13

Primal Leadership - Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence

The authors’ main argument in this book is that leaders should excel not just through the use of skills and intelligence, but also connect strongly with others using emotional intelligence – by this meaning how leaders handle themselves and their relationships. Their premises for these arguments are, although grounded in recent breakthroughs in neurology, still controversial. Basically, the book answers two questions: what emotional resources do leaders need to thrive, and how do leaders create an emotional organizational climate that fosters sustainable change? The authors present a range of concepts and thoughts to answer the above. The best part of the book is the advice to help individuals develop their emotional capabilities, but other parts of the book are not convincing. Despite some of its weaknesses, the book functions well as an easy-to-read guidebook for leaders who want to develop their own emotional intelligence. What makes good leaders is one of those subjects that will be debated forever. But this review concludes that it is no longer enough to lead by virtue of power alone.Successful leaders must to be able to apply the whole range of capabilities. However, there is not much room today for the emotional leadership as recommended in this book. The book’s timing is therefore good – leaders need more than ever to appear nice, and renewed leadership agendas are needed. I conclude that today’s business/public environments and people issues are far too complex to return to a top-down, power based style leadership. Emotional intelligence will be an important key to leadership in the future, but this conclusion is more a function of belief and values, than based on traces of what we can see today.

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Posted on:2011-06-13

The Affect of Emotional Intelligence on a Modern Organizational Leader’s Ability to Make Effective Decisions

Effective management of organizations and human resources is facing enormous challenges. Organizations are downsizing, reengineering themselves to compete in the global market and facing an explosion of available information (Luthans, 1998). Max Messmer (1999), CEO of Robert Half, said in a recent survey of 150 executives from some of the nation’s largest companies, that leadership skills were identified as the most important assets of managers. James E. Perrella (1999), Chairman, President and CEO, Ingersoll-Rand Company, stated

America is moving from a manufacturing economy to a value-added, service-oriented economy. And at the heart of service is relationships: interpersonal relationships; intergroup relationships; and interdepartmental relationships. The ascendance of work teams in large organizations puts a new premium on relationship team skills. Among others, this set of skills includes the following competencies: 1. communicating or listening openly and sending convincing messages, 2. managing conflict, which entails negotiating and resolving disagreements, 3. inspiring and guiding individuals and groups as a leader, 4. initiating and managing change, and 5. collaborating and cooperating with others toward shared goals (Perrella, 1999, p 437).

These two examples indicate the growing importance of finding, hiring, training, and retaining leaders with high emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is defined as a person’s self-awareness, self-confidence, self-control, commitment and integrity, and a person’s ability to communicate, influence, initiate change and accept change (Goleman, 1998). Studies have shown that emotional intelligence impacts a leader’s ability to be effective (Goleman, 1998). Three of the most important aspects of emotional intelligence for a leader’s ability to make effective decisions are self-awareness, communication and influence, and commitment and integrity. Managers who do not develop their emotional intelligence have difficulty in building good relationships with peers, subordinates, superiors and clients (Goleman, 1998).

The following paper is an examination of how emotional intelligence affects a leader’s ability to make effective decisions. The first part of the essay defines the parameters of emotional intelligence, leadership and effective decision-making. This is followed by a discussion of how the aspects of emotional intelligence affect a leader’s ability to make good decisions and how emotional intelligence is integral to Stephen Covey’s seven habits of highly successful people and Warren Bennis’ beliefs on what leadership is. The last section of the paper concludes with the leadership responsibilities that are implemented through the use of emotional intelligence.

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Posted on:2011-06-13

The Economic Value of Emotional Intelligence

Acceptance of emotional intelligence competency (EIC) concepts and programs by academics, professionals, and organizations will ultimately depend on their demonstrated validity and utility. This chapter reviews the rationale and methods for evaluating EIC-based human resource programs in monetary terms, and it also presents preliminary met a-analytic estimates of the economic value added by these interventions.

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Posted on:2011-06-10

Do Programs Designed to Increase Emotional Intelligence at Work - Work?

The recent and widespread interest in the importance of emotional intelligence (EI) at work (Goleman, 1995) has led to the development of programs that are designed to (1) educate people about the relevance of emotional intelligence in the workplace, (2) assess their relative strengths and weaknesses, and (3) provide a framework to develop and enhance their ability to interact with others with greater emotional intelligence (Boyatzis, 1999). The present research will attempt to provide some evidence for the effectiveness of an emotional intelligence training program; specifically, whether participants. scores on a measure of EI improve after exposure to a program designed to increase emotional intelligence at work.

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Posted on:2011-06-09

The Business Case for Emotional Intelligence

The following 19 points build a case for how emotional intelligence contributes to the bottom line in any work organization. Based on data from a variety of sources, it can be a valuable tool for HR practitioners and managers who need to make the case in their own organizations.

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Posted on:2011-06-09

Emotional Intelligence Deficit: Any Hopes?

Earlier, it was believed that emotions did not have a role to play in the professional life of individuals. However, of late it is believed that emotions are equally important if not more at the work places. The ability of a person to percieve, control and evaluate emotions is referred to as emotional intelligence. THe case of Raunak Sharma at THe Ivory Plastic Company serves as n apt example in this context. Sharma was the person in charge of the new division of moulded furniture at Ivory and he was extremely good at delivering business results. However, he did not know how to manage his as well as others emotions. Consequently, the lack of emotional intelligence cost him his job. What impact does emotional intellignece have on leadership? Further, if a person is low on emotional intelligence as was the case with Sharma, can he acquire it through practice or is it something inherent in a person? Is emotional quotient as important as intelligence quotient to be successful professionally.

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Posted on:2012-01-28