leadership

High Potential Leaders: Why Executive Coaching Makes Such a Difference

Adults are almost universally attracted to babies because they are pure potential. We see in them every possible future. The same can be said of individuals in your organization who are being groomed for future leadership roles. One vital part of nurturing high-potential leaders is providing executive coaching to these rising superstars.

Six Principles

Emotional Intelligence in Leaders: Real Life Examples

What makes a good leader? Is it the steely certitude of a General Patton? Was Abraham Lincoln a good leader because he doubted himself, or in spite of his self-doubt? Researchers are realizing that emotional intelligence is an important part of the well-rounded leader. History is replete with examples of leaders whose interpersonal and intrapersonal skills best served their companies, their causes, or their countries.

CEOs

How Executive Coaching Can Help You Avoid Decision Making Traps

The battle of Hattin was fought when an executive leader, Guy de Lusignan, led his organization of 20,000 crusaders on the offensive against Saladin. Lusignan abandoned the lush Springs of Sephora in the Palestine desert and marched — in July without water — across a desert plain. Saladin drew Lusignan’s parched army into a trap, destroying it. 

An Annotated Resource List and Knowledge Inventory for a Performing Arts Institute Curriculum

This list of references was compiled through interviews with leaders in the fieldand extensive Internet searches. To the extent possible, each reference includes adirect link to the listed publication as well as a brief description of the topicdiscussed in the publication. If the publication is cross-referenced in anothersection of the listing, a note to that effect is provided. References are listed inalphabetical order by author.

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This list of references was compiled through interviews with leaders in the fieldand extensive Internet searches.

Posted on:2016-02-18

Listening in Enterprise Leadership

This month focuses on an area of the organization that is very pertinent to developing 
enterprise leadership, that of listening.  The case for the month is drawn from U.S. 
political history, and highlights President Jimmy Carter’s efforts to create a 
transformational change in the direction of the nation.

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Posted on:2016-02-18

Dysfunctional Leadership

This study comes from a study done in Zimbabwe.  Of interest here is the descriptor ofleadership dysfunction.  Dandira uses both ends of the spectrum to attempt to illustrate whatleadership is not and at the same time, what it is.  Using cancer as an analogy is often used inliterature to describe events that, if left unchecked, can seriously harm the overall health andwell-being of the organism.  Like cancer, dysfunctional leadership, on a large enough scale, canbe fatal to the organization.  

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Posted on:2016-02-18

Leadership in a Globalizing World Study Guide

Here we get an overview of the phenomenon of globalization as we currently understand it.  Rosabeth Moss Kanter has done a fairly comprehensive analysis of global meta-trends from both the corporate and societal perspective.  It is an excellent overview, which creates simple directions for leaders illustrated through numbers of corporate case.

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Posted on:2016-02-17

Constructing leadership by storytelling – the meaning of trust and narratives Study Guide

Purpose: This paper approaches manager’s storytelling as a means for promoting organizational aims and for constructing leadership, and examines the intentions of managers in this process. We focus on the context of storytelling and the content of the stories told by managers in order to identify areas of influence on subordinates. Storytelling in relation to building a narrative identity for the manager is also studied.

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Posted on:2016-02-17

Strategy for the Critical First 90 Days of Leadership

Accelerating transitions
Think about the implications of more effective transition management not just for you but alsofor your organization. In a survey of company presidents and CEOs, I asked for their bestestimate of the number of people whose performance was signi®cantly compromised by thearrival of a new mid-level manager. The average of their responses was 12.4 people[2]. In effect,all the people in the ``impact network'' of the transitioning manager are in transition too.

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Posted on:2016-02-15

Leaders and Leadership – Many Theories, But What Advice is Reliable?

An enterprise in crisis, for example, will conjure up a charismatic leader to steer the organization between Scylla and Charybdis and into a greater future; in tranquil or halcyon times, we demand only that our leaders maintain stability and maximize returns or market share! So are there aspects of leadership about which we can all agree? How should we understand leading and leadership? How can we behave to achieve the best results? How can we become leaders who have a benign influence on the behavior and beliefs of the organization? How can we best evaluate leaders? How can we identify and nurture potential leaders? A short history of leadership literature Leaders have fascinated us from the beginning of history it seems, and their stories form the bedrock of human culture.

Writers often cite Gorbachev, Thatcher, Reagan and Kennedy as evidence for the importance of charisma; some suggest that followers can bestow charismatic qualities upon their leaders - that is, they endow leaders with the qualities necessary to satisfy the need for security, safety, direction.

Leadership manifests when the designated or nominal leader and the followers interact in a particular context and culture, usually working together in a common cause to produce a significant decision or action; the specific leadership event actually occurs periodically in the interstices or at the interfaces between the leader and follower or stakeholder.

In other words, leaders must practice strategic management - develop a researched vision, a viable strategy, a focused plan and a measured implementation process and then prepare for discontinuity by continuously monitoring the environment.

The research support for the effectiveness of such training is meager, and there's little evidence that leadership-academy graduates are uniquely equipped to lead. Harvard professor and leadership critic Barbara Kellerman agrees: she observes that most subordinates don't consider their leaders to be either honest or competent, and she complains that the leadership industry is ''self-satisfied, self-perpetuating, and poorly policed.

Leadership theory and principles can be taught, but my experience over the past six decades - as both a leader and a follower - suggests that leadership behavior must be both learned and put to use.

Leaders attend to the needs of multiple stakeholders; they balance economic and non-economic goals and they establish and monitor both short-term and long-term performance metrics.

Aplethora of guidance awaits managers seeking to become better leaders, but muchof the advice is based on questionable evidence, most of it anecdotal. Leadingacademics don’t even agree on what constitutes leadership or which leadership practices can be successfully emulated.
In the endless avalanche of self-help books on leadership there are recommendations forhow to become a leader, behave like a leader, train other leaders, be a pack leader, achange leader, a mentor leader, a Zen leader, a tribal leader, a platoon leader, an introvertedleader or a triple-crown leader. The popular press offers us myriad case histories of leadersfrom Steve Jobs to the captain of the ‘‘best damned ship in the US Navy’’ that showcase anexample of success, formulate a set of principles based on it and prescribe those practicesfor leaders everywhere. None of the books I’ve seen, however, takes the next step anddescribes how managers who adopted the recommended practices fared as comparedwith their competitors who did not.

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Posted on:2016-02-15

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