leadership training

360 Degree Feedback: Its Role in Employee Development

While it is accepted generally that feedback is invaluable within organizations,especially in managing employee behaviour, much research suggests that theflow of feedback in organizations is typically constrained[1]. Numeroussuggestions have been put forward to free up feedback channels – is one such mechanism. The focus of this article is on 360 degreefeedback which is defined as a contrived method of providing a flow offeedback to employees from all directions. The article addresses the followingissues: the functions of the feedback within the organization, with a specialemphasis placed on its use for employee career development; the benefits ofsuch feedback to the organization and the individuals involved; themechanisms used to obtain feedback; and, finally, the pitfalls of 360 degreefeedback and its implementation..Although the names are different, the process is essentially the same. Theredoes not appear to be a distinct individual who founded or invented this processand, according to Moses et al.[2], the term “360 degree feedback” is misleadingas it suggests a newly discovered concept, whereas they argue that perceptionsof people have been available as long as there have been people to observe them.Their argument suggests that 360 degree feedback is a case of “old wine in newbottles”; the process has always existed within organizations but lately hasdeveloped the new label of 360 degree feedback.Whether it is old wine or new wine, the bottle is certainly new and feedback’s use by organizations is on the increase. It is estimated that Americancompanies spent $152 million on this form of feedback for developmentpurposes in 1992[3]. According to Van Veslor et al.[4], the number of feedback instruments has increased significantly in the past 15 year. 

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Posted on:2016-02-17

Leadership Training in the United States: Can It Live Up to Its Potential

As much as the United States needed education on ecommerce and the Interneteconomy, U.S. companies now need to focus on their core businesses and setstrategies that will lead them back to sustained performance. Training vendors andtheir clients will increasingly demand leadership training to impact the performance ofthe nearly 14 million workers in the United States in leadership roles.

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Posted on:2016-02-15

A Principal Components Analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory

As other psychological constructs come and go, the concept of narcissism has had a long, and in many ways, formidable history. Narcissism was first introduced into psychological literature in 1898, when Havelock Ellis used the term Narcissus-like to refer to "a tendency for the sexual emotions to be lost and almost entirely absorbed in self-admiration " (Ellis, 1898).Shortly after this reference appeared, Nacke (1899) wrote a German summary of the Ellis paper in which he used the term Narcismus to refer to a sexual perversion whereby a person treats his or her own body as a sexual object. Although Nacke was an obscure figure in German psychiatry at the time, his reference to narcissism caught Freud's attention. Apparently the concept of narcissism made a deep impression on Freud, for by 1914 narcissism had become a focal construct in his meta psychological and clinical thinking, so much so that con-temporary historians of the psychoanalytic movement generally agree that Freud's explorations into narcissism were central to the development of his (a) structural model (id, ego, and super-ego); (b) concept of the ego ideal and subsequently the superego;(c) shift from an id psychology to an ego psychology; and (d)object relations theory (e.g., Fine, 1986; Moore, 1975; Sandier, Holder, & Dare, 1976; Tiecholz, 1978).  As with many of Freud's more important concepts, his thinking pertaining to narcissism tended to follow two separate yet interdependent lines of development. Narcissistic Personality Inventory

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Posted on:2011-06-13